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The civil war in Liberia destroyed the countries educational infrastructure and left a generation of school goers traumatized and forced out of the classroom for more than a decade. Schooling came to a halt as parents feared letting their children outdoors, bombs destroyed schools and still committed teachers had no safe place to ply their trade. Scores of young Liberians were kidnapped and forced to become child soldiers and school for them became a pipe dream. In this episode of It’s Africa’s Time our crew journeys back to Liberia to gauge progress in a unique education partnership between the Global Fund for Education, The World Bank, The Liberian Ministry of Education and AECOM to deliver more than 40 schools to post war Liberia and up-skill Liberians in the building trade in the next few years. Our guide is a remarkable former child soldier, Kelvin, who was kidnapped at the age of 10 and returned to school after the war.

Gallery

  • A section o the brand new school at Billytown, Liberia
  • Aecom Project Manager Barry Barrat and Liberian Education Misitry representative David Baysey at one of the GPE school sites
  • Assembley at the Billytown Elementary Public School in Montserrado outside of Monrovia
  • Former child soldier Kelvin Pavay Davies reminds pupils at Billytown Public Elementary School about the importance of education
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  • New schools await for thousands of Liberian children. 40 will be built during this phase of the GPE Schools programme in partnership with Aecom
  • The existing school at Billytown. Liberia 1
  • Waiting for a new school building, Billytown Liberia

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New schools for Liberia
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It’s Africa’s Time journeys back to Liberia to gauge progress in a unique education partnership between the Global Fund for Education, The World Bank, The Liberian Ministry of Education and AECOM to deliver more than 40 schools to post-war Liberia and upskill Liberians in building trade in the next few years.

AECOM